Idioma / Language: Spanish

Chenonceau: between confirmation of diagnosis and too busy gluten-free restaurants

We were still in France. After visiting Carcassonne and Orleans, we had decided to change the plan of that day and go to visit the Castle of Chenonceau and, if we had time, the Castle of Chambord too. Although we did not have time to visit this second, we had a great day. Unlike our trip last year, when we visited the Neuschwanstein Castle, we did not find any gluten free restaurant there. At least not with the gluten free apps we had.

That day we ate another of the brownies we had prepared at home, before starting the trip. While Isabel was looking for the route to get to the castle and information about tickets and so on, I prepared our lunch. This time rice with hamburger, sweet corn and peas.

Upon arriving at the castle, it was clear that it was June! There was very short line to buy tickets. After passing the security checkpoint where they searched for weapons or explosives, we followed the main avenue guarded by towering trees to the castle gates.

It was a really quiet place. Although it is not the most impressive – far from it -, for me, the Castle of Chenonceau is one of the most interesting, since unlike the others, it is on the river. In fact, this was the reason why we first visited this one.

Click on the image to access the form

Inside you can know all its history. We loved walking around it and see the reflections that projected above the river. If you expect large rooms in the castle, you will not find them. On the outside it looks very big, but the whole part that is above the water, is a large and wide corridor that takes you to the other side. The rooms and kitchens are on the mainland building.

While we were walking through the gardens, they called me from Parc Taulí Hospital in Sabadell to comment on the results of the biopsies that I had brought them from the last endoscopy. Even after strict treatment for four months, it still had a fairly high presence of eosinophils in the mucosa of the esophagus. This, coupled with the fact that I sometimes have trouble swallowing food – a horror for those of us who like to eat – gave way to confirming that I have Eosinophilic Esophagitis. Another chronic disease to carry in your backpack. I will have to chew better to avoid impaction!

Suddenly, we realized that it was 2:00 pm… too late to eat and get to the other castle! Knowing this, we took the rest of the time there more calmly.

While we went out the main door, we saw the indications of the hospital museum and headed towards it. Although we were still hungry, we were no longer in a hurry to get anywhere else. On the way to the hospital museum, we saw a restaurant and, since we were there, we stopped to ask if they had anything gluten free.

The waitress, a little stressed, explained that her mother also had coeliac disease, and that eating gluten free in France was very difficult, since there were very few restaurants and information available. Then she took us in front of the menu.

There at least it was indicated that some dishes could contain wheat gluten. When she came back to ask if we were staying, we told her that it was very good that they had indications in the menu. Even if it was only the vegetable crudités and the meat. We did not like her answer so much: “Yes, well, but better confirm it with the waiter if there is cross contamination”. Suddenly it came to my mind what happened in Paris, so, we politely went to eat what we had in the car fridge.

We arrived early at the apartment, so we spent the rest of the afternoon preparing the next stop: Amsterdam! We really wanted to get there, because since we started dating we never stopped talking about visiting this city.

For dinner, we made a bacon and cheese omelet and went to bed. The next day we had another 6h drive to arrive to our next destination and we wanted to get up early.

You can see the pictures of the trip here.

BY CLICKING ON THE MAP OF GLUTEN FREE RESTAURANTS YOU FILL SEE ALL RESTAURANTS WE DESCRIBED IN THIS POST LOCATED IN THE MAP OF GLUTEN-FREE PLACES:

AND HERE WE LEAVE THE CELIAC TRAVEL CARD IN FRENCH:

P.S.: Please keep in mind that in this blog I share my trips, anecdotes and experiences about gluten free travel around the world. It is possible that, in any of my trips, I go to some restaurant not trained by the associations where the risk of being contaminated with gluten exists. I kindly ask you to also take into account that the list of references can change. Please, always double check before eating in the restaurants we recommend. Thank you very much!

TO NOT MISS ANY OF OUR POSTS, WE INVITE YOU TO SUBSCRIBE TO OUR NEWSLETTER!

Subscribe to our mailing list

* indicates required